Welcome

The Mayernik Real Estate Group has kept pace, adapting to rapid growth and a changing economy while maintaining exacting standards and integrity. Please explore the resources within this website, and contact me with any questions or comments.

As an active, local agent, I am available to address all of your real estate needs.

Please give me a call or email when you are ready to visit some homes, or to schedule a free home selling consultation. I look forward to working with you!

Keller Williams Premier 2355 Route 33 / Robbinsville, NJ 08691

Additional Details

  • Wheelchair Accessible:Yes
  • Near Public Transportation:Yes
  • Kid Friendly:Yes
  • Parking Available:Yes
  • Online Appointments:Yes

    Welcome Megan Mayernik to The Mayernik Real Estate Group Megan Mayernik Megan is a Sales Associate and the youngest member of The Mayernik Group. She is also a student at The College of New Jersey studying Business Administration with a concentration in Management. Megan’s youth brings a new perspective to the marketing side of our business. Megan’s favorite thing about working in Real Estate is having the ability to help people find their dream homes while working on a team of such inspiring people.

    Announcement
    Q How can I find out how my property is zoned?

    Zoning ordinances and maps are a matter of public record. Visit your local zoning office, city hall, or some other local planning board and get a copy of your local ordinance.

    In some areas, if you have a legal description of the property (name, address, tax map, and parcel number), you can call the zoning office or city hall, or even e-mail your request for information.

    Some communities also have their zoning maps and ordinances online and in local libraries.

    Q How do building codes work?

    Building codes set minimum public-safety standards for such things as building design, construction, use and occupancy, and maintenance. The codes are established and enforced by local politicians and government officials, who also tend to modify them constantly. The codes are usually enforced by denying permits, occupancy certificates, and by imposing fines.

    While codes vary from one state, county, city, and town to the next, specialized codes generally exist for plumbing, electricity, and fire. Each usually involves separate inspections and inspectors.

    There are building codes for most remodeling jobs. So if you have done significant remodeling, make sure you save proof of the permits involved in the project. There is a good chance potential buyers may request them. Failure to obtain the appropriate permits before you undertake a project could later result in fines or other serious consequences, such as having a structure ordered to be torn down because it was constructed improperly.

    Q Should I always get a permit before making home improvements?

    To save both time and money, some people avoid getting building permits. But most cities require them. Besides ensuring safety during construction – housing inspectors sometimes stop by to check on the progress of projects at key points – they are also a source of revenue.

    Cities charge a fee when a building permit is issued. Also, work done with a building permit can result in an increase in the homeowners’ property taxes because, in general, a home improvement increases the assessed value of the property.

    Permits are usually required when any structural work is planned or the basic living space of a home is altered. They generally cover new construction, repairs, alterations, demolition, and additions to a structure. Some jurisdictions require the permit to be posted in a visible spot on the premises while the work is being done.

    Besides structural changes, permits also may be needed to cover the installation of foundations for tanks and equipment, as well as the construction or demolition of ducts, sprinkler systems, or standpipe systems. By law, all buildings must have a building permit and a certificate of occupancy before they can be used.

    Q What is a variance?

    It is a request made to your local jurisdiction to deviate from current zoning requirements. If granted, a variance will allow you to use your land in a way that is normally not permitted by the zoning ordinance.

    However, do not view a variance as something that changes the zoning law because it does not. Rather it waives a certain requirement of the zoning ordinance. For example, it may allow the owner of an odd-shaped lot to reduce slightly the setback requirements in order to accommodate a building, or permit the building of a gazebo in the back yard.

    Q Does the federal government offer home improvement programs?

    Yes. Among the most popular:

    Title 1 Home Improvement Loan. HUD insures the loan up to $25,000 for a single-family home and lenders make loans for basic livability improvements – such as additions and new roofs – to eligible borrowers.
    Section 203(k) Program. HUD helps finance the major rehabilitation and repair of one- to four-family residential properties, excluding condos. Owner-occupants may use a combination loan to purchase a fixer-upper "as is" and rehabilitate it, or refinance a property plus include in the loan the cost of making the improvements. They also may use the loan solely to finance the rehabilitation.
    VA loans. Veterans can get loans from the Department of Veterans Affairs to buy, build, or improve a home, as well as refinance an existing loan at interest rates that are usually lower than that on conventional loans.
    Rural Housing Repair and Rehabilitation Loans. Funded by the Agriculture Department, these low-rate loans are available to low-income rural residents who own and occupy a home in need of repairs. Funds are available to improve or modernize a home or to remove health and safety hazards.

    Q How does refinancing work?

    With a refinancing, you pay off an old loan on your home and take out a new one, usually at a lower mortgage interest rate. To refinance, you will generally need to have equity in your home, a good credit rating, and steady income. You can borrow a percentage of the equity to cover remodeling costs, debt consolidate, and college tuition.

    When you refinance, you will incur all the closing costs that go along with getting a new mortgage. So unless you're doing extensive renovations and can get a mortgage interest rate at least two points below your current loan rate, you may want to select another financing option.

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